Ben Demers

About Ben Demers

Ben Demersis a DC-based communications professional, writer, and DCTS Board Member. As a digital media strategist by day, he relishes the transportive experience of live theater and still gets chills when the lights dim before each show. He performed music and theater productions extensively in high school & college and joins in short plays, open mic nights, and the occasional karaoke binge when he can. He received an MA in Public Relations from Georgetown and a BA from Vassar College.

Copenhagen at Theater J (review)

Tell me if this sounds familiar: Two people locked in a pivotal contest of ideas and ideologies, steeped in international espionage, with the fate of millions hanging in the balance. If you guessed “European physicists discussing electrons in 1941”, you’re a better student of history than I.

The Night Alive at Quotidian Theatre (review)

Playwright Conor McPherson has a signature knack for framing the big questions inside quiet, unassuming lives. In Quotidian Theatre Company’s moving production of McPherson’s The Night Alive, his downtrodden characters share existential debates, flickering hopes, and brief kindnesses in a dingy flat on the outskirts of Dublin. Beneath the hanging gloom and pessimistic Irish humor, I […]

Witch, a potent brew, from Convergence Theatre (review)

As we approach Halloween, Convergence Theatre sets out to prove to audiences that the most shocking horror can derive not from our imaginations, but from our own cruel history.

The Last Schwartz at Theater J (review)

Family – just because you love them, doesn’t mean you have to like them. Theater J’s alternately side-splitting and emotional production of The Last Schwartz follows the dysfunctional Schwartz family as they struggle against the current of ever-changing values, priorities, and geography. It asks a tough question: What holds a family together, when shared traditions […]

Next to Normal at Keegan Theatre (review)

Seven years ago, Tom Kitt and Brian Yorkey explored the devastating cost of mental illness in their Tony-winning Broadway debut of Next to Normal.  Now Keegan Theatre is bringing the gripping psychological saga of Diana and her struggling family to DC, pinning local audiences to their seats with wrenching emotion and dark humor.

Kinky Boots tour at The Kennedy Center (review)

The Kennedy Center’s crowd-pleasing yet inconsistent production of Kinky Boots could also be called “A Tale of Two Musicals”. Show-stopping soul and R&B numbers led by the transcendent J. Harrison Ghee alternate frustratingly with cookie cutter ballads featuring struggling co-lead Adam Kaplan. It’s still an enjoyable show, but it’s a long way from reaching its […]

Ballast at Source Festival (review)

The transgender community’s newfound visibility and public support, after years of living in the shadows, has not come easily. Georgette Kelly’s moving Ballast follows the journeys of several transgender people and their loved ones, examining the emotional fallout and public consequences that arise when people flip long-held gender norms on their head to lead more […]

Crossroads at Source Festival (review)

Dreams are, by and large, a random jumble of thoughts and experiences remixed by our subconscious. They may not make a lot of sense, but they certainly leave an impact. That’s largely how I felt about Crossroads – a cryptic yet moving meditation on the intersection of dreams and reality, now playing at Source Festival.

Happy Hour at Spooky Action (review) Brilliant live action gaming

As gaming and virtual reality become ever more ingrained into popular culture, it’s about time that some creative minds brought it into the world of theater. In the interactive escape drama Happy Hour, Spooky Action Theater and Goethe-Institut bring immersive, gamified action to Washington and ask audiences “What would happen if the game characters were […]

Strindberg’s The Pelican from Arcturus (review)

From Shakespeare to “Arrested Development”, when family and large inheritances mix, things are bound to get messy. Arcturus Theater Company’s adaptation of August Strindberg’s surrealist The Pelican delivers an arresting look at the corrosive effects of greed, mental illness, and keeping up appearances at all costs.

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