Steven McKnight

About Steven McKnight

Steven McKnight is a recovering lawyer who now works in a lobbying firm and enjoys the drama of political theatre on both sides of the aisle. He admires authors, actors, athletes, teachers, and chefs, and has dabbled in all of those roles with mixed (and occasionally hilarious) results.

Wicked. Pop-u-lar and deservedly so. At the Kennedy Center (review)

Wicked is one of the most loved musicals in history, regularly selling out Broadway’s largest theatre since 2003 and spawning several national tours, the most recent now in an outstanding production at The Kennedy Center.

Fully Committed at MetroStage. (review)

Tom Story provides a comedic tour-de-force as the frenetic and frazzled Sam and forty other characters in the hilarious Fully Committed at MetroStage.

Love Jones: The Musical – soulful sounds at The National (review)

If you loved the terrific 1997 film Love Jones, you may want to cue up that DVD again.  Before the opening night show at The National Theatre, an announcement was made that this production of Love Jones: The Musical, was “inspired by” the film but without any of the original dialogue, poetry, or songs.  If you can overcome […]

Thief and nun on the run in Little Thing, Big Thing (review)

You can almost feel the Fringe/touring roots of Little Thing, Big Thing from the mixture of story-telling with theatre, the acting challenges given the small cast, the clever blending of genres, and the ambitious themes.  Irish playwright Donal O’Kelly has written an unusually dexterous work full of comedy and surprises that receives a smashing Solas Nua.

Staunton’s starring role in Gypsy airing on PBS Friday, Nov 11

What do Ethel Merman, Angela Lansbury, Tyne Daly, Bernadette Peters, and Patti LuPone have in common?  They have all played the iconic role of Mama Rose in Gypsy, one of the greatest works in musical theatre history. 

A Matter of Perspective from Live Garra Theatre (review)

A Matter of Perspective is a provocative new work that examines racial tensions in the context of jury deliberations.  It is a stimulating work with the potential for greater accomplishment, but like much of today’s racial dialogue, gets caught up in preconceptions and animosity that limit its contributions.

Five film musicals to watch for – some you’ve seen onstage

I love musicals.  I prefer my musicals live and in person; however, I will take a good musical wherever I can find it regardless of setting or format. Below is a list in chronological order of five upcoming musicals (more or less) that can be found in movie theatres or on television.  I am eagerly […]

Marsha Norman’s ‘Night Mother at Highwood Theatre (review)

It has been 31 years since this reviewer previously saw a live production of Marsha Norman’s Pulitzer Prize winning drama ‘NIGHT, MOTHER, yet it remains an indelible theatre experience.  The fine production mounted by Your Theatre at The Highwood Theatre conjures up the power and pathos of this excellent play.

Lobby Hero at 1st Stage (review)

Kenneth Lonergan’s Lobby Hero is a rare work that is, at once, a drama, a comedy, a romance, a mystery, and a modern morality play.  It is an outstanding work that makes for equally outstanding theatre in 1st Stage’s excellent production. 

Teachout’s Satchmo at the Waldorf at Mosaic Theater (review)

Louis Armstrong, arguably the first jazz superstar, achieved world-wide fame as a trumpet player, composer, singer, occasional actor. Satchmo at the Waldorf by Terry Teachout (best known as The Wall Street Journal’s theatre critic) presents the Louis Armstrong the public didn’t know, and Mosaic Theater Company of DC and Craig Wallace provide a fascinating, behind-the-scenes look […]

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