What Did You Expect? Review: Election year continues for the Gabriel family

What Did You Expect?, the second installment of Richard Nelson’s trilogy at the Public subtitled The Gabriels: Election Year In The Life Of One Family, is literate (the characters tell a story about Melville; read from Edith Wharton and Euripides), aromatic (they cook a meal), and, arguably, misleading: The name “Trump” is uttered only once. […]

Privacy Review: Daniel Radcliffe in playful, interactive look at our surveillance society

Privacy,a play exploring the death of privacy, is inspired by Edward Snowden’s revelations about surveillance. Snowden even appears on stage (via video.) But, for all its alarming info, the show is more playful interactive lecture than cautionary drama: An audience member may even find herself on a date with Daniel Radcliffe.

New York Spectacular Review — The Radio City Rockettes bring NYC Tourist Attractions to Life

New York Spectacular, a new summer show at Radio City Music Hall that features the Radio City Rockettes and some terrific sets, aims to tap into a similar demographic as Broadway, where more than two-thirds of the theatergoers are tourists. But its appeal to tourists is more direct. It’s basically a sightseeing tour of New […]

Public’s all-woman cast takes on Taming of the Shrew in Central Park

The all-female production of The Taming of the Shrew in Central Park, with Janet McTeer as the macho Petruchio and Cush Jumbo as the shrew he starves into obedience, seems to be working hard to make the play more palatable. Director Phyllida Lloyd starts by evoking a certain presidential candidate and former beauty pageant owner.

Who SHOULD win The Tony Awards Sunday night

Update: Hamilton won 11 awards and The Humans four, including best musical and best play respectively. See all the winners: NewYorkTheater.me Contrary to popular belief, more than one worthy show opened on Broadway this past season, although admittedly Hamilton has become a much-ballyhooed phenomenon in the culture at large.  The musical was part of what many […]

Hamilton sparks Tony question: are sung-through musicals just concerts with benefits?

New York Times drama critic Charles Isherwood inadvertently sparked a controversy when, in a discussion of the 2016 Tony Awards, he commented about Hamilton: “I do find it slightly puzzling that it was nominated in the book of a musical category, since the show is almost sung-through, but it’s the kind of juggernaut we haven’t […]

Watch: How Broadway stars wind down after the show

Actors train to get into character, but how do they get out of it? What happens at the end of a night’s intense performance, or at the conclusion of a run?

Turn Me Loose Review: Scandal’s Joe Morton in play about Dick Gregory

“Don’t get me wrong, I do care about this country,” Joe Morton as comedian Dick Gregory says in Turn Me Loose. “Where else but in America can a poor black boy like Michael Jackson grow up to be a rich, white man?”

Indecent (review): Paula Vogel creates backstage story of Jewish play that sparked a prosecution

While Broadway is reacquainting audiences with Shuffle Along, Off-Broadway is opening our eyes to another landmark Broadway show from the 1920s – this one an all-Jewish, lesbian-themed drama that led to a criminal prosecution. Indecent is both a fascinating history lesson written by Pulitzer-winning Paul Vogel, and a cleverly staged entertainment directed by Rebecca Taichman.

Daphne’s Dive opens at Signature, NYC (review)

Daphne’s Dive, a play about a family of regulars at a North Philly bar, is put together by a family of exciting artists:  Samira Wiley (Poussey in Orange is the New Black) and Daphne Rubin-Vega (Rent) are in the cast.  Playwright Quiara Alegría Hudes (In The Heights)  reunites with director Tommy Kail (Hamilton.)

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